G. Campbell Morgan

It is because the resurrection has not been properly appreciated as the message of God, which is the severest condemnation of sinning man, that men have still imagined that apart from the Passion and passing of Jesus of Nazareth, it may be possible for them to be accepted of God.

Gazing into the darkness of the grave which Jesus has left, man should recognize the utter hopelessness of his condition, and the utter folly of attempting to please God. When the Eternal raised Jesus from the grave and took Him to Himself, He by that act hurled the whole race to destruction. No man saw Him rise. The very disciples were denied the vision. It may be urged that the weakness of their faith was the reason of their failure in this respect. And yet in that very fact is evident the act of God. As in the Cross there was manifest the element of lawlessness, crucifying the Son, and the element of Divine counsel and foreknowledge; so also in the resurrection there is manifest man's failure in his absence, and God's rejection of man, in that he was not permitted to see the stupendous glory of the acceptance of the perfect One.

The act of God in the resurrection of Jesus, was one characterized by marvellous majesty and overwhelming power. In describing this, Paul speaks in language that almost seems to be redundant, and yet is surely necessary to give some indication of the stupendous fact. He writes: "That working of the strength of His might." The might of God, the strength of the might of God, the working of the strength of the might of God. Simply to read this is to feel the irresistible throb of omnipotence. In the quietness of that first day of the week, when the first shafts of light were gleaming on the eastern sky, the disciples being absent, and the enemies, as represented by the soldiers, being rendered blind by the glory of the angelic splendor, God raised Him.

Adapted from The Crises of the Christ, Book VI, Chapter XXVI, by G. Campbell Morgan.